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The Will of God  

The Will of God  

Do you want to know what God’s will is for your life? One thing I know: The better you get to know the WORD of God the less confusing the WILL of God will be.


Below is a small sampling of the words of God that reveal the will of God for us. Are you ready?


I Thessalonians 4:11-12 (Be responsible and faithful in all your endeavors)


I Timothy 5:8 (Provide for your family and household)

Galatians 2:10 (Remember the poor)


Ephesians 6:4 (Raise your kids by the Lord’s instruction)

Psalm 1:2 (Meditate on the scriptures)


I Thessalonians 5:16-18 (Rejoice always, pray continually, and give thanks in all things)


Hebrews 10:25 (Meet together and encourage one another)


Colossians 3:2 (Live with a Kingdom mindset–not the world’s mindset)


Psalm 119:105 (Let the word of God be a lamp that guides you)

Philippians 4:6-7 (Don’t be anxious, but let the peace of God rule your heart and mind)


Those who struggle the least with the will of God are usually those who know the word of God best. Please read these scriptures and see what they say to you about the will of God for you!

Greg


Do you want to know what God’s will is for your life? One thing I know: The better you get to know the WORD of God the less confusing the WILL of God will be.


Below is a small sampling of the words of God that reveal the will of God for us. Are you ready?


I Thessalonians 4:11-12 (Be responsible and faithful in all your endeavors)


I Timothy 5:8 (Provide for your family and household)

Galatians 2:10 (Remember the poor)


Ephesians 6:4 (Raise your kids by the Lord’s instruction)

Psalm 1:2 (Meditate on the scriptures)


I Thessalonians 5:16-18 (Rejoice always, pray continually, and give thanks in all things)


Hebrews 10:25 (Meet together and encourage one another)


Colossians 3:2 (Live with a Kingdom mindset–not the world’s mindset)


Psalm 119:105 (Let the word of God be a lamp that guides you)

Philippians 4:6-7 (Don’t be anxious, but let the peace of God rule your heart and mind)


Those who struggle the least with the will of God are usually those who know the word of God best. Please read these scriptures and see what they say to you about the will of God for you!

Greg


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A Sheep of His Fold

A Sheep of His Fold

Over and over in the Scriptures Jesus speaks of himself as the shepherd and us as the sheep. It’s an analogy that would have had great meaning to those who first heard the gospel. People in Jesus’ day were well acquainted with the work of a shepherd.


Philip Keller, author of A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, tells us that the key to understanding a shepherd is to understand the nature of sheep. He writes in his book that sheep are “dependent, dumb, defenseless, directionless, and easily distracted.” Hmmm. Does that sound like anybody you know?


Here’s the deal. When a sheep grazes he moves with his head down, taking small steps as he follows the food. Having a little nibble here and a little nibble there, he moves further and further away from the safety of the fold. When he finally looks up, he’s lost. Worse yet, he can’t find his way home. (Are you sure that doesn’t ring a bell?) Unlike some animals, a sheep has no homing device. He has to be sought out by the loving shepherd and brought back into the fold.


In Jesus’ day, the sheep of several different folds were brought together for the night, usually into a makeshift pen. Besides having no homing device, I guess sheep don’t have very good eyesight either; they can’t recognize their shepherd. So in the morning their shepherd must walk among them in the pen, softly talking to them. His sheep recognize his voice and follow him to the green pastures for the day. That’s how a shepherd sorted his own sheep out of the larger flock. They had to stay very close to him and listen for his voice so they didn’t lag behind, get lost, or wander into danger.


In John Chapter 10 (one of my favorite verses in all of Scripture) Jesus lets us know that we can count on his voice: “My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me.”


He continues by telling us a little bit about his heart and care toward us: “…and I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand.” John 10:27-28


How beautiful is that? Friends, we all, like sheep, have wandered away. We all need a shepherd. And as for me, I’m happy to be a treasured sheep of His fold.


Baa-aa,

Greg


Over and over in the Scriptures Jesus speaks of himself as the shepherd and us as the sheep. It’s an analogy that would have had great meaning to those who first heard the gospel. People in Jesus’ day were well acquainted with the work of a shepherd.


Philip Keller, author of A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, tells us that the key to understanding a shepherd is to understand the nature of sheep. He writes in his book that sheep are “dependent, dumb, defenseless, directionless, and easily distracted.” Hmmm. Does that sound like anybody you know?


Here’s the deal. When a sheep grazes he moves with his head down, taking small steps as he follows the food. Having a little nibble here and a little nibble there, he moves further and further away from the safety of the fold. When he finally looks up, he’s lost. Worse yet, he can’t find his way home. (Are you sure that doesn’t ring a bell?) Unlike some animals, a sheep has no homing device. He has to be sought out by the loving shepherd and brought back into the fold.


In Jesus’ day, the sheep of several different folds were brought together for the night, usually into a makeshift pen. Besides having no homing device, I guess sheep don’t have very good eyesight either; they can’t recognize their shepherd. So in the morning their shepherd must walk among them in the pen, softly talking to them. His sheep recognize his voice and follow him to the green pastures for the day. That’s how a shepherd sorted his own sheep out of the larger flock. They had to stay very close to him and listen for his voice so they didn’t lag behind, get lost, or wander into danger.


In John Chapter 10 (one of my favorite verses in all of Scripture) Jesus lets us know that we can count on his voice: “My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me.”


He continues by telling us a little bit about his heart and care toward us: “…and I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand.” John 10:27-28


How beautiful is that? Friends, we all, like sheep, have wandered away. We all need a shepherd. And as for me, I’m happy to be a treasured sheep of His fold.


Baa-aa,

Greg


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Grip of Grace

Grip of Grace

Have you ever tried to hold a little bird in your hands?


I’ve done it and it’s not easy, especially if the bird is injured or frightened. It will fight you at first and try to escape. You can often feel its tiny heart beating. It flutters and struggles, and to keep it from wiggling away you have to cup it in both of your hands, fingers laced together. You have to hold it just so––just tight enough so it doesn’t fly away and just loose enough not to crush it. But if you are gentle and patient it will eventually settle down, sensing it is secure and safe in your hands.


When we are injured or frightened, friends, we sometimes act like that little bird.


We want to escape. We flutter. We struggle. But when we eventually realize we cannot help ourselves, then we are free to be still and see that our Heavenly Father holds us in a warm, safe place––just tight enough so we don’t fly away and just loose enough so we are not crushed. And oh, it is a grace-filled place to be. Have you ever been there?


Some would call it surrender; I would call it the Grip of Grace. It is that place where nothing can touch us but the fingers of God that surround us. It is the sweet relief of surrendering to hands more powerful than we are, knowing that our strength is not sufficient and that in His grip alone will we find safety and rest.


There are times when there is no better place to be than in the strong, gentle hands of our loving Father. “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.”
-2 Corinthians 12:9 (NIV)


So what do you do when you find yourself in the Grip of Grace? You be still. You rest. You wait. For He will most assuredly deliver you back onto solid ground.


A Grace-filled weekend to you.

Greg


Have you ever tried to hold a little bird in your hands?


I’ve done it and it’s not easy, especially if the bird is injured or frightened. It will fight you at first and try to escape. You can often feel its tiny heart beating. It flutters and struggles, and to keep it from wiggling away you have to cup it in both of your hands, fingers laced together. You have to hold it just so––just tight enough so it doesn’t fly away and just loose enough not to crush it. But if you are gentle and patient it will eventually settle down, sensing it is secure and safe in your hands.


When we are injured or frightened, friends, we sometimes act like that little bird.


We want to escape. We flutter. We struggle. But when we eventually realize we cannot help ourselves, then we are free to be still and see that our Heavenly Father holds us in a warm, safe place––just tight enough so we don’t fly away and just loose enough so we are not crushed. And oh, it is a grace-filled place to be. Have you ever been there?


Some would call it surrender; I would call it the Grip of Grace. It is that place where nothing can touch us but the fingers of God that surround us. It is the sweet relief of surrendering to hands more powerful than we are, knowing that our strength is not sufficient and that in His grip alone will we find safety and rest.


There are times when there is no better place to be than in the strong, gentle hands of our loving Father. “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.”
-2 Corinthians 12:9 (NIV)


So what do you do when you find yourself in the Grip of Grace? You be still. You rest. You wait. For He will most assuredly deliver you back onto solid ground.


A Grace-filled weekend to you.

Greg


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New Beginnings

New Beginnings

I was thinking the other day about all the sorrow and discouragement this Covid-19 pandemic has created among people. It brought to mind the story of the prophet, Jeremiah, as told in the Old Testament Book of Lamentations.


Jeremiah is depressed. He has watched the wayward Israelites suffering because they are turning away from God. Not only that, but Jeremiah feels alienated from God too. The whole first part of Chapter 3 is full of his pain and lament.


But then, beginning in verse 21 we hear something change.


“Yet this I call to mind and therefore I have hope: Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail.
They are new every morning…”
Lamentations 3:21-23 (NIV)


This Scripture is beautiful even in the midst of pain and sorrow. It reminds us that we can always turn away from the old and toward a new beginning. It reminds us of God’s great compassion for us. His mercies are new every morning; not just once or twice, but there every time for us.


Believe you can have a new beginning, even in the midst of discouragement or depression. Believe God means it. Step into his mercies that are there for you to embrace every morning.


Turn your face toward him. “Yet this I call to mind…” He is faithful.

Greg


I was thinking the other day about all the sorrow and discouragement this Covid-19 pandemic has created among people. It brought to mind the story of the prophet, Jeremiah, as told in the Old Testament Book of Lamentations.


Jeremiah is depressed. He has watched the wayward Israelites suffering because they are turning away from God. Not only that, but Jeremiah feels alienated from God too. The whole first part of Chapter 3 is full of his pain and lament.


But then, beginning in verse 21 we hear something change.


“Yet this I call to mind and therefore I have hope: Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail.
They are new every morning…”
Lamentations 3:21-23 (NIV)


This Scripture is beautiful even in the midst of pain and sorrow. It reminds us that we can always turn away from the old and toward a new beginning. It reminds us of God’s great compassion for us. His mercies are new every morning; not just once or twice, but there every time for us.


Believe you can have a new beginning, even in the midst of discouragement or depression. Believe God means it. Step into his mercies that are there for you to embrace every morning.


Turn your face toward him. “Yet this I call to mind…” He is faithful.

Greg


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Clean Pipes

Clean Pipes

I’ve been reading a book I have by Steve Backlund called Possessing Joy: A Secret to Strength & Longevity. In the book he talks about cleaning out our pipes.


I grew up in the midwest where, in some areas, the water would come out of the faucet rusty––even an orange tinted color. That’s because often the old pipes were rusty, and even if it was great water, it was being tainted by the pipes that it flowed through. By the time that good water flowed through those rusty pipes, it tasted terrible.


Hmm. Along that same line we might ask, “What flows out of me? And how clean are my pipes?”


If our lives are full of frustration, fear or hopelessness, what comes out of us will be tainted by those things. No matter how truthful or enlightening or wonderful our words are, what we speak is colored by our inner terrain and self-talk.


One of the ways to combat this is to ask God what he has to say about what is happening around us instead of listening to all the negative news that makes us discouraged and unhappy. We don’t always have a choice about what happens to us or around us, and right now some of those things are pretty discouraging. But we do have a choice in how we filter them.


In these days we are called upon to sort out fact from fiction, truth from speculation, and speak hope and life into a very dark place.


And since we are a pipeline for the hope of the living God, I would recommend we keep our spiritual pipes clean and flowing so that what comes out of us will be sweet for others to drink.

Greg



I’ve been reading a book I have by Steve Backlund called Possessing Joy: A Secret to Strength & Longevity. In the book he talks about cleaning out our pipes.


I grew up in the midwest where, in some areas, the water would come out of the faucet rusty––even an orange tinted color. That’s because often the old pipes were rusty, and even if it was great water, it was being tainted by the pipes that it flowed through. By the time that good water flowed through those rusty pipes, it tasted terrible.


Hmm. Along that same line we might ask, “What flows out of me? And how clean are my pipes?”


If our lives are full of frustration, fear or hopelessness, what comes out of us will be tainted by those things. No matter how truthful or enlightening or wonderful our words are, what we speak is colored by our inner terrain and self-talk.


One of the ways to combat this is to ask God what he has to say about what is happening around us instead of listening to all the negative news that makes us discouraged and unhappy. We don’t always have a choice about what happens to us or around us, and right now some of those things are pretty discouraging. But we do have a choice in how we filter them.


In these days we are called upon to sort out fact from fiction, truth from speculation, and speak hope and life into a very dark place.


And since we are a pipeline for the hope of the living God, I would recommend we keep our spiritual pipes clean and flowing so that what comes out of us will be sweet for others to drink.

Greg


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 A Crushed Spirit

 A Crushed Spirit

In last night’s Zoom meeting we talked about the hurt and damage of rejection.


Rejection is one of those abuses that can rob, steal and destroy us for a lifetime if we let it.


Rejection comes to us in many ways and by many different channels. It can come to us purposefully or unintentionally, through consistent abuse or a simple, thoughtless comment. Its impact on us is to crush our self-worth. Proverbs 18:14 says, “A crushed spirit, who can bear it?”


We must come face to face with our rejection and acknowledge it in our life; and we must take action to forgive those those who visited it upon us. Then we will be able to have the power to let it go and release it, replacing it with the love and acceptance of Jesus.


As we have been studying in John we have been reminded of what Jesus said to his disciples, “As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Now remain in my love.” John 15:9 (NIV)


And oh how deeply he loves you. We must know his love for us to combat rejection.


So here is an affirmation/inspiration to ponder, or put on your mirror, thanks to the excellent writings of William Thrall and Bruce McNicol of TrueFaced:


As a maturing Christian, I no longer define myself by my sin or the sin committed against me, but by who God declares me to be.


Let your hope–not your hurt–shape your future.

Greg


In last night’s Zoom meeting we talked about the hurt and damage of rejection.


Rejection is one of those abuses that can rob, steal and destroy us for a lifetime if we let it.


Rejection comes to us in many ways and by many different channels. It can come to us purposefully or unintentionally, through consistent abuse or a simple, thoughtless comment. Its impact on us is to crush our self-worth. Proverbs 18:14 says, “A crushed spirit, who can bear it?”


We must come face to face with our rejection and acknowledge it in our life; and we must take action to forgive those those who visited it upon us. Then we will be able to have the power to let it go and release it, replacing it with the love and acceptance of Jesus.


As we have been studying in John we have been reminded of what Jesus said to his disciples, “As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Now remain in my love.” John 15:9 (NIV)


And oh how deeply he loves you. We must know his love for us to combat rejection.


So here is an affirmation/inspiration to ponder, or put on your mirror, thanks to the excellent writings of William Thrall and Bruce McNicol of TrueFaced:


As a maturing Christian, I no longer define myself by my sin or the sin committed against me, but by who God declares me to be.


Let your hope–not your hurt–shape your future.

Greg


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Pretty Prayers

Pretty Prayers

So let’s talk about prayer today. We know Scripture tells us to pray always, but what if you just don’t feel like it?


What if your prayers today aren’t going to come out so nice? What if you’re mad at God? What if you hate the world and everything in it? Or you think God doesn’t care anyway, so what’s the use? What about when your faith is weak, or the times when you’re a little embarrassed to bring your latest mess to the throne?


Does that ever happen to you? Author and writer of The Message, Eugene Peterson, says,


“It is easy to be honest before God with our hallelujahs; it is somewhat more difficult to be honest in our hurts; it is nearly impossible to be honest before God in the dark emotions of our hate. In prayer, all is not sweetness and light.”


Friends, prayer is honest talk more than anything. God can take it; he knows your stuff anyway. He wants to hear from you rather than see you hide, for it is in the act of laying your heart before him that he can speak life into it. He longs to be in communication with you in your darkest hour, not just your moments of victory.


Read this prayer of David in Psalm 77:

“Will the Lord walk off and leave us for good?
Will he never smile again?
Is his love worn threadbare?
Has his salvation promise burned out?
Has God forgotten his manners?
Has he angrily stalked off and left us?
‘Just my luck,’ I said. ‘The High God goes out of business just the moment I need him.'”


Sounds honest, doesn’t it? But notice that something happens as David talks honestly to his Father–a transformation of sorts. It seems like he is able to see more clearly as he sorts his feelings out with his Heavenly Father. And God steps in and touches his cold, insolent heart with new life.


The Psalm continues:”Once again I’ll go over what God has done, lay out on the table the ancient wonders;
I’ll ponder all the things you’ve accomplished, and give a long, loving look at your acts.
O God! Your way is holy!
No god is great like God!”
-Psalm 77:7-13 (The Message)


So next time you don’t feel like praying, just talk to God as you go about your business at home. Don’t worry that your prayers aren’t pretty; be concerned that they are honest.


I find in my own life that God is often the very best one to talk my feelings out with. Just make sure you stick around for Him to step in and surprise you! Greg


So let’s talk about prayer today. We know Scripture tells us to pray always, but what if you just don’t feel like it?


What if your prayers today aren’t going to come out so nice? What if you’re mad at God? What if you hate the world and everything in it? Or you think God doesn’t care anyway, so what’s the use? What about when your faith is weak, or the times when you’re a little embarrassed to bring your latest mess to the throne?


Does that ever happen to you? Author and writer of The Message, Eugene Peterson, says,


“It is easy to be honest before God with our hallelujahs; it is somewhat more difficult to be honest in our hurts; it is nearly impossible to be honest before God in the dark emotions of our hate. In prayer, all is not sweetness and light.”


Friends, prayer is honest talk more than anything. God can take it; he knows your stuff anyway. He wants to hear from you rather than see you hide, for it is in the act of laying your heart before him that he can speak life into it. He longs to be in communication with you in your darkest hour, not just your moments of victory.


Read this prayer of David in Psalm 77:

“Will the Lord walk off and leave us for good?
Will he never smile again?
Is his love worn threadbare?
Has his salvation promise burned out?
Has God forgotten his manners?
Has he angrily stalked off and left us?
‘Just my luck,’ I said. ‘The High God goes out of business just the moment I need him.'”


Sounds honest, doesn’t it? But notice that something happens as David talks honestly to his Father–a transformation of sorts. It seems like he is able to see more clearly as he sorts his feelings out with his Heavenly Father. And God steps in and touches his cold, insolent heart with new life.


The Psalm continues:”Once again I’ll go over what God has done, lay out on the table the ancient wonders;
I’ll ponder all the things you’ve accomplished, and give a long, loving look at your acts.
O God! Your way is holy!
No god is great like God!”
-Psalm 77:7-13 (The Message)


So next time you don’t feel like praying, just talk to God as you go about your business at home. Don’t worry that your prayers aren’t pretty; be concerned that they are honest.


I find in my own life that God is often the very best one to talk my feelings out with. Just make sure you stick around for Him to step in and surprise you! Greg


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Waves

Waves

Greetings All!


This week we had the chance to escape to the ocean for a few days. I love to watch the waves. I love the ‘always changing but never changing’ patterns of the waves. I love the movement. It brings me to a place of peace and rest.


As those waves crash on the shore, especially if there are rocks around, they scatter spray everywhere. If you’re close you can’t help but get sprinkled….and often doused!


I have said many times that Christianity is more “caught” than “taught.” That’s one of the reasons I am so adamant about community. It’s a place where the life of Christ can be ‘brought, caught & taught’. One of my favorite theologians, the great C.S. Lewis, once said it like this:


“Good things as well as bad, you know, are caught by a kind of infection. If you want to get warm you must stand near the fire; if you want to be wet you must get into the water.


If you want joy, power, peace, eternal life, you must get close to, or even into, the thing that has them.


If you are close to it, the spray will wet you; if you are not, you will remain dry.”
– C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity


I challenge all of us, especially if we’re feeling dry, to draw nearer to the joy, power, peace and eternal life which is intrinsic in the personhood of Jesus Christ. When we get close to Him, the spray will get us.


Or we can throw abandon out the window and jump in!

Greg


Greetings All!


This week we had the chance to escape to the ocean for a few days. I love to watch the waves. I love the ‘always changing but never changing’ patterns of the waves. I love the movement. It brings me to a place of peace and rest.


As those waves crash on the shore, especially if there are rocks around, they scatter spray everywhere. If you’re close you can’t help but get sprinkled….and often doused!


I have said many times that Christianity is more “caught” than “taught.” That’s one of the reasons I am so adamant about community. It’s a place where the life of Christ can be ‘brought, caught & taught’. One of my favorite theologians, the great C.S. Lewis, once said it like this:


“Good things as well as bad, you know, are caught by a kind of infection. If you want to get warm you must stand near the fire; if you want to be wet you must get into the water.


If you want joy, power, peace, eternal life, you must get close to, or even into, the thing that has them.


If you are close to it, the spray will wet you; if you are not, you will remain dry.”
– C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity


I challenge all of us, especially if we’re feeling dry, to draw nearer to the joy, power, peace and eternal life which is intrinsic in the personhood of Jesus Christ. When we get close to Him, the spray will get us.


Or we can throw abandon out the window and jump in!

Greg


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Situation Excellent

Situation Excellent

Greetings All!


We’ve heard in the news this week that Arizona is one of the few states where Covid-19 cases are still rising. That is not good news to us and it means we are still needing to remain alert and treat this outbreak responsibly for the sake of ourselves and those around us.

It also calls us to remain steadfast in prayer against this evil onslaught, and for that I refer to the Apostle Paul who reminds us:
“Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.”
Eph. 6:12 (NIV)

I read a story once about a French lieutenant general named Ferdinand Foch. At the First Battle of the Marne during World War I, Foch sent this communique back to headquarters:
“My center is giving way, my right is retreating. Situation excellent. I am attacking.”

What a decision. His willingness to see things differently in a tough situation led to victory for his troops.
When Paul was thrown into prison for preaching the gospel he wrote to the church at Philippi, “Now I want you to know, brothers, that what has happened to me has really served to advance the gospel.”
Phil. 1:12 (NIV)

Paul saw his imprisonment as a new platform to speak the gospel message to the Roman prison guards, even in the midst of a brutal, filthy prison.

Yes, we are in a battle. But let’s keep our focus straight. The battle is not against people, bureaucrats or governments, nations or organizations. Ultimately, the battle is spiritual, and therefore we fight it by looking at things differently.

Sure, it’s easy to get down, easy to be angry and easy to blame. But “easy” is not our calling. As believers in Christ we get to see through different eyes and bring hope, peace and purpose, even to this situation. As believers in Christ we can always find a way to conclude: “Situation excellent.”

Greg

Greetings All!


The beach ball above is because this week marks the first day of Summer.


We’ve also heard in the news this week that Arizona is one of the few states where Covid-19 cases are still rising. That is not good news to us and it means we are still needing to remain alert and treat this outbreak responsibly for the sake of ourselves and those around us.


It also calls us to remain steadfast in prayer against this evil onslaught, and for that I refer to the Apostle Paul who reminds us:
“Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.”
Eph. 6:12 (NIV)


I read a story once about a French lieutenant general named Ferdinand Foch. At the First Battle of the Marne during World War I, Foch sent this communique back to headquarters: “My center is giving way, my right is retreating. Situation excellent. I am attacking.”


What a decision. His willingness to see things differently in a tough situation led to victory for his troops. When Paul was thrown into prison for preaching the gospel he wrote to the church at Philippi, “Now I want you to know, brothers, that what has happened to me has really served to advance the gospel.”
Phil. 1:12 (NIV)


Paul saw his imprisonment as a new platform to speak the gospel message to the Roman prison guards, even in the midst of a brutal, filthy prison.


Yes, we are in a battle. But let’s keep our focus straight. The battle is not against people, bureaucrats or governments, nations or organizations. Ultimately, the battle is spiritual, and therefore we fight it by looking at things differently.


Sure, it’s easy to get down, easy to be angry and easy to blame. But “easy” is not our calling. As believers in Christ we get to see through different eyes and bring hope, peace and purpose, even to this situation. As believers in Christ we can always find a way to conclude: “Situation excellent.”
Greg


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Burdened

Burdened

When I talk to people lately it seems like many of us are overwhelmed, fearful, burdened. And let’s face it, there’s a lot to be burdened about these days. Not only with the Covid-19 epidemic itself, but everything else that has gone along with it: unemployment and financial troubles, depression, fear, anxiety, anger, sickness and death. Our world has been turned upside down.


I always go to the Psalms when I need a fresh perspective. Psalm 68:19 reads “Praise be to the Lord, to God our Savior, who daily bears our burdens.” Ps. 68:19 (NIV)


For those of you who have ever hiked a long way with a heavy backpack, you know how nice it is to have someone come alongside you and say, “Let me carry that.” Well, that is what God says to us every day, “Let me carry that.”


That’s easier said than done, I realize. It’s hard to let go of those burdens! But his word is true and he can bear the burden so we might settle back in him and trust.


Here’s another great translation of that same verse from the English Standard Version: “Blessed be the Lord, who daily bears us up.”
Ps. 68:19 (ESV)


Do you feel how God bears you up? When we find ourselves in deep water, the Lord’s arms come to lift us up and out of danger, set us on the shore. Be aware of that. Listen for that. Let him.

If you’re overburdened or overwhelmed these days, I remind you that your Heavenly Father is faithful. Go to the word of God (Psalms is good) and seep in it. Call someone who can encourage you and remind you of how “safe” you really are.

You don’t have to carry it all.

Love and Peace,
Greg

When I talk to people lately it seems like many of us are overwhelmed, fearful, burdened. And let’s face it, there’s a lot to be burdened about these days. Not only with the Covid-19 epidemic itself, but everything else that has gone along with it: unemployment and financial troubles, depression, fear, anxiety, anger, sickness and death. Our world has been turned upside down.


I always go to the Psalms when I need a fresh perspective. Psalm 68:19 reads “Praise be to the Lord, to God our Savior, who daily bears our burdens.” Ps. 68:19 (NIV)


For those of you who have ever hiked a long way with a heavy backpack, you know how nice it is to have someone come alongside you and say, “Let me carry that.” Well, that is what God says to us every day, “Let me carry that.”


That’s easier said than done, I realize. It’s hard to let go of those burdens! But his word is true and he can bear the burden so we might settle back in him and trust.


Here’s another great translation of that same verse from the English Standard Version: “Blessed be the Lord, who daily bears us up.”
Ps. 68:19 (ESV)


Do you feel how God bears you up? When we find ourselves in deep water, the Lord’s arms come to lift us up and out of danger, set us on the shore. Be aware of that. Listen for that. Let him.

If you’re overburdened or overwhelmed these days, I remind you that your Heavenly Father is faithful. Go to the word of God (Psalms is good) and seep in it. Call someone who can encourage you and remind you of how “safe” you really are.

You don’t have to carry it all.

Love and Peace,
Greg